Mar 3, 2017

100 Phrasal Verbs You Really Need To Know (REVIEW)

157 cards
, 671 answers
  • DOWN

    Fit the verbs into the two categories.
    • cut down
      • reducing
      • failing

    • turn something down
      • reducing
      • failing

    • let somebody down
      • failing
      • reducing

    • turn somebody or something down
      • reducing
      • failing

    • break down
      • reducing
      • failing

    • slow down
      • reducing
      • failing

  • Complete each sentence with a noun or an adjective related to one of the verbs in the box.
    • There was an old  . . . 
      broken-down
      truck by the side of the road.
      • breakdowns
      • slowdown
      • let down
      • broken-down

    • Most delays are caused by accidents, roadworks or vehicle  . . . 
      breakdowns
      .
      • slowdown
      • broken-down
      • let down
      • breakdowns

    • There has been a  . . . 
      slowdown
      in the world economy.
      • broken-down
      • slowdown
      • let down
      • breakdowns

    • Many movie stars are a bit of a  . . . 
      let down
      when you meet them.
      • broken-down
      • slowdown
      • let down
      • breakdowns

  • Complete these sentences with one of the verbs in the correct form.
    • She was  . . . 
      turned
      down for the job because of her age.
      • cut
      • settle
      • letting
      • turned
      • turn
      • put
      • slow

    • I drink far too much coffee. I really should  . . . 
      cut
      down.
      • letting
      • cut
      • slow
      • turned
      • turn
      • put
      • settle

    • Can you  . . . 
      turn
      your CD player down? I can’t get to sleep.
      • put
      • letting
      • turned
      • slow
      • cut
      • turn
      • settle

    • I think my daughter is far too young to get married and  . . . 
      settle
      down.
      • turn
      • cut
      • settle
      • letting
      • slow
      • put
      • turned

    • If you fail this exam again, you’ll be  . . . 
      letting
      the whole family down.
      • turned
      • cut
      • put
      • turn
      • slow
      • letting
      • settle

    • You’ll break that vase!  . . . 
      Put
      it down!
      • Slow
      • Turn
      • Settle
      • Turned
      • Letting
      • Cut
      • Put

    • The car couldn’t  . . . 
      slow
      down in time and crashed into a tree.
      • turn
      • letting
      • settle
      • turned
      • slow
      • cut
      • put

  • OFF

    Put the verbs into the three categories.
    • cut somebody off
      • ending
      • stopping or preventing
      • departing or leaving

    • set off
      • ending
      • departing or leaving
      • stopping or preventing

    • turn something off
      • ending
      • departing or leaving
      • stopping or preventing

    • take off
      • departing or leaving
      • stopping or preventing
      • ending

    • put something off
      • stopping or preventing
      • departing or leaving
      • ending

    • drop somebody or something off
      • ending
      • departing or leaving
      • stopping or preventing

    • get off, get off something
      • stopping or preventing
      • departing or leaving
      • ending

    • log off, log off something
      • departing or leaving
      • ending
      • stopping or preventing

  • Give the opposites of the phrasal verbs in these sentences.
    • Where do we get off the bus?
      • put on
      • turn on
      • land
      • pick up
      • get on
      • log on

    • I’ll drop you off at your hotel.
      • get on
      • land
      • put on
      • turn on
      • log on
      • pick up

    • Don’t forget to log off when you have finished using the computer.
      • log on
      • land
      • pick up
      • put on
      • turn on
      • get on

    • I’ll turn the lights off.
      • turn on
      • pick up
      • land
      • put on
      • get on
      • log on

    • The plane took off at 12.20.
      • log on
      • land
      • get on
      • put on
      • pick up
      • turn on

    • Would you like to take your coat off?
      • put on
      • get on
      • pick up
      • log on
      • land
      • turn on

  • Match the phrasal verbs in these sentences with their single word synonyms.
    • Let’s put the meeting off until next week.
      • remove
      • postpone
      • distract
      • leave

    • Don’t stand there watching me—you’re putting me off.
      • distract
      • remove
      • postpone
      • leave

    • We set off at midday.
      • remove
      • leave
      • distract
      • postpone

    • Can you take your boots off before you come indoors?
      • remove
      • postpone
      • leave
      • distract

  • Complete the following sentences with a noun or an adjective related to the phrasal verbs: tell somebody off, put somebody off or take off.
    • Do not use mobile phones during  . . . 
      take-off
      and landing.
      • take-off
      • telling-off
      • off-putting

    • I got a terrible  . . . 
      telling-off
      from Mom!
      • take-off
      • telling-off
      • off-putting

    • I find her manner very  . . . 
      off-putting
      .
      • telling-off
      • off-putting
      • take-off

  • Complete these sentences with a verb in the correct form.
    • The water supply to the house had been  . . . 
      cut
      off.
      • cut
      • turn
      • gone
      • got
      • drop
      • told
      • put

    • I think the milk’s  . . . 
      gone
      off.
      • told
      • turn
      • got
      • put
      • gone
      • cut
      • drop

    • The bus stopped, but no one  . . . 
      got
      off.
      • told
      • put
      • turn
      • gone
      • drop
      • got
      • cut

    • The town had been  . . . 
      cut
      off by the floods.
      • gone
      • drop
      • got
      • turn
      • told
      • put
      • cut

    • Ask the driver to  . . . 
      drop
      you off at the supermarket.
      • put
      • got
      • told
      • cut
      • gone
      • drop
      • turn

    • The last person to leave should  . . . 
      turn
      off all the lights.
      • put
      • turn
      • drop
      • told
      • cut
      • gone
      • got

    • My father was so ill we had to  . . . 
      put
      off the wedding until he was better.
      • drop
      • cut
      • gone
      • told
      • put
      • turn
      • got

    • I  . . . 
      told
      the boys off for making so much noise.
      • drop
      • told
      • got
      • turn
      • cut
      • put
      • gone

    • The terrible smell in the room  . . . 
      put
      me off my food.
      • put
      • gone
      • told
      • drop
      • turn
      • got
      • cut

  • OUT

    Fit the verbs into the three categories.
    • go out
      • leaving or going outside
      • solving
      • finishing or ending

    • find out, find something out
      • solving
      • leaving or going outside
      • finishing or ending

    • check somebody or something out
      • solving
      • finishing or ending
      • leaving or going outside

    • get out, get out of something
      • solving
      • finishing or ending
      • leaving or going outside

    • put something out
      • leaving or going outside
      • solving
      • finishing or ending

    • wear out, wear something out, wear somebody or yourself out
      • leaving or going outside
      • solving
      • finishing or ending

    • run out, run out of something
      • finishing or ending
      • leaving or going outside
      • solving

    • sell out, sell out of something, be sold out
      • solving
      • finishing or ending
      • leaving or going outside

    • work out
      • finishing or ending
      • leaving or going outside
      • solving

    • check out, check out of something
      • solving
      • leaving or going outside
      • finishing or ending

    • sort something out
      • leaving or going outside
      • finishing or ending
      • solving

    • work something out
      • leaving or going outside
      • finishing or ending
      • solving

  • Use one of the verbs below in suitable form to complete the comments:
    • A: You can check in any time after 2 p.m.
      B: When should we  . . . 
      check out
      ?
      • go out
      • give them out
      • check out
      • work it out
      • have gone out

    • A: I just couldn’t figure out what he was doing.
      B: No, I couldn’t  . . . 
      work it out
      either.
      • work it out
      • go out
      • give them out
      • check out
      • have gone out

    • A: The lights  . . . 
      have gone out
      .
      B: I hope they come on again soon.
      • go out
      • give them out
      • check out
      • work it out
      • have gone out

    • A: I’ve got a lot of papers to hand out.
      B: Shall I help you  . . . 
      give them out
      ?
      • check out
      • go out
      • work it out
      • have gone out
      • give them out

    • A: Shall we stay in tonight?
      B: No, let’s  . . . 
      go out
      .
      • work it out
      • have gone out
      • go out
      • give them out
      • check out

  • Rewrite each sentence using a noun or an adjective formed from the verb below.
    • His shoes were old and had large holes in them.
      His shoes were

      • He hates parties and he’s looking for an excuse not to go.
        He hates parties and he’s looking for

        • Every ticket for the concert had been sold.
          The concert was

          • I’m so tired! I’ve cleaned the whole house today.
            I’m I’ve cleaned the whole house today!

          • Choose the best verb to fit in the spaces in these sentences:
            • Do you believe his story? Perhaps we should  . . . 
              check
              it out.
              • check
              • sort
              • find

            • We can’t have any coffee—the milk’s  . . . 
              run
              out.
              • run
              • sold
              • gone

            • I wish I could  . . . 
              get
              out of the meeting. I’m so busy.
              • check
              • get
              • go

            • I’d love some tea, but I don’t want to  . . . 
              put
              you out at all.
              • leave
              • put
              • sort

            • Dave was upset he was  . . . 
              left
              out of the team.
              • got
              • left
              • put

            • Can you  . . . 
              work
              out the answer to number 2?
              • work
              • check
              • leave

            • The tickets for the concert are all  . . . 
              sold
              out.
              • gone
              • sold
              • run

            • How long will it take to  . . . 
              sort
              out the problem?
              • check
              • sort
              • work

            • You can’t smoke in here. Can you  . . . 
              put
              your cigarette out, please?
              • check
              • put
              • leave

            • I’ve cleaned the whole apartment today. I has  . . . 
              worn
              me out.
              • put
              • worn
              • sorted

          • UP

            Put the verbs into the three categories.
            • fill something up
              • increasing or improving
              • stopping or delaying
              • completing or finishing

            • break up
              • increasing or improving
              • completing or finishing
              • stopping or delaying

            • grow up
              • stopping or delaying
              • completing or finishing
              • increasing or improving

            • give up, give up something
              • increasing or improving
              • stopping or delaying
              • completing or finishing

            • bring somebody up
              • completing or finishing
              • stopping or delaying
              • increasing or improving

            • speak up
              • increasing or improving
              • completing or finishing
              • stopping or delaying

            • hang up, hang up something
              • completing or finishing
              • increasing or improving
              • stopping or delaying

            • cheer up, cheer somebody or something up
              • increasing or improving
              • stopping or delaying
              • completing or finishing

            • blow something up
              • increasing or improving

            • hold somebody or something up
              • stopping or delaying
              • completing or finishing
              • increasing or improving

            • wake up, wake somebody up
              • stopping or delaying
              • increasing or improving
              • completing or finishing

            • turn something up
              • completing or finishing
              • stopping or delaying
              • increasing or improving

          • Match the phrasal verbs in these sentences with their opposites in the box.
            • I’ve seceded to take up line dancing.
              • drop off
              • turn down
              • take up
              • undo
              • put down
              • give up

            • He had difficulty doing up the buttons on his coat.
              • undo
              • put down
              • take up
              • turn down
              • drop off
              • give up

            • When did you give up smoking?
              • undo
              • turn down
              • put down
              • give up
              • take up
              • drop off

            • Can you turn up the heating a bit?
              • turn down
              • put down
              • drop off
              • undo
              • give up
              • take up

            • I’ll pick you up at your house.
              • drop off
              • undo
              • take up
              • turn down
              • put down
              • give up

            • She picked the vase up carefully.
              • take up
              • put down
              • drop off
              • undo
              • give up
              • turn down

          • Complete the sentences with a noun or an adjective.
            • George had a very strict  . . . 
              upbringing
              .
              • look-ups
              • upbringing
              • hold-ups
              • wake-up
              • made-up
              • pickup
              • break-up

            • It took him a long time to recover from the  . . . 
              break-up
              of his marriage.
              • upbringing
              • wake-up
              • made-up
              • look-ups
              • pickup
              • hold-ups
              • break-up

            • It isn’t true story. It’s a  . . . 
              made-up
              one.
              • upbringing
              • pickup
              • look-ups
              • hold-ups
              • break-up
              • made-up
              • wake-up

            •  . . . 
              Hold-ups
              are expected because of roadworks at the junction.
              Upbringing
              • Look-ups
              • Hold-ups
              • Wake-up
              • Pickup
              • Break-up
              • Made-up

            • There’s a bus  . . . 
              pickup
              point in front of the hotel.
              • wake-up
              • upbringing
              • look-ups
              • pickup
              • hold-ups
              • made-up
              • break-up

            •  . . . 
              Look-ups
              on this site are free and easy to use.
              • Hold-ups
              • Break-up
              • Wake-up
              • Look-ups
              • Upbringing
              • Made-up
              • Pickup

            • What time would you like your  . . . 
              wake-up
              call?
              • look-ups
              • pickup
              • break-up
              • hold-ups
              • wake-up
              • made-up
              • upbringing

          • Rearrange the verbs so that each sentence has the correct verb.
            • He was so rude! When he heard my voice on the phone he just  . . . 
              hung
              up!
              • hung
              • cheered

            • I didn’t know the answer to the question so I  . . . 
              made
              one up.
              • owned
              • made

            • Who broke the window? Will someone  . . . 
              own
              up?
              • hang
              • own

            • I didn’t like your boss. I don’t know how you  . . . 
              put
              up with him.
              • caught
              • put

            • Dan looked so miserable but I  . . . 
              cheered
              him up.
              • cheered
              • held

            • The rest of the group were still so far ahead I knew Jack hadn’t  . . . 
              caught
              up with them.
              • put
              • caught

            • Julia was late again today. I think the traffic  . . . 
              held
              her up.
              • held
              • picked

            • I  . . . 
              picked
              up the kids from school this afternoon.
              • made
              • picked

          • Rewrite these sentences, replacing the noun or phrase in italics with a pronoun in the correct position.
            • I decided not to look up the words in a dictionary.
              I decided not to

              • How do you put up with that noise all the time?
                How do you

                • I’m sure he made up that story.
                  I’m sure

                  • When did you take up judo?
                    When did you

                  • OTHER PARTICLES

                    Put each verb in the correct category.
                    • turn something on
                      • starting
                      • removing
                      • continuing
                      • movement in a particular direction

                    • throw something away
                      • continuing
                      • removing
                      • starting
                      • movement in a particular direction

                    • get in, get in something
                      • starting
                      • movement in a particular direction
                      • removing
                      • continuing

                    • give something away
                      • movement in a particular direction
                      • removing
                      • continuing
                      • starting

                    • log on, log onto something
                      • starting
                      • movement in a particular direction
                      • continuing
                      • removing

                    • go on
                      • starting
                      • removing
                      • continuing
                      • movement in a particular direction

                    • get on, get on something
                      • movement in a particular direction
                      • starting
                      • removing
                      • continuing

                    • turn over, turn somebody or something over
                      • continuing
                      • starting
                      • removing
                      • movement in a particular direction

                  • Choose the best verb to fit into the spaces in these sentences:
                    • Can you describe what she  . . . 
                      had
                      on when you last saw her?
                      • held
                      • got
                      • had

                    • Put your shoes on properly or you’ll  . . . 
                      fall
                      over.
                      • turn
                      • get
                      • fall

                    • Shall we  . . . 
                      check
                      in before we have a cut of coffee?
                      • check
                      • fill
                      • log

                    • It took him a long time to  . . . 
                      get
                      over his illness.
                      • fall
                      • get
                      • throw

                    •  . . . 
                      Hold
                      on. I’ll get some paper to write all that down.
                      • Come
                      • Turn
                      • Hold

                    • Please  . . . 
                      fill
                      in your full name and your address.
                      • turn
                      • fill
                      • log

                  • GET

                    Match each sentence with an explanation of the meaning in the box.
                    • Anna got off the bus and started to walk along the road.
                      • to avoid a responsibility or duty
                      • to succeed in entering a place
                      • to get into a bus, train, plane, car
                      • to leave a bus, train or plane
                      • to manage to find a way out of a place
                      • to have a friendly relationship with somebody
                      • to get out of bed
                      • to return to your usual state of health or happiness after an illness, a shock

                    • It’s 6.30! You should be getting up now.
                      • to have a friendly relationship with somebody
                      • to manage to find a way out of a place
                      • to return to your usual state of health or happiness after an illness, a shock
                      • to succeed in entering a place
                      • to avoid a responsibility or duty
                      • to get out of bed
                      • to get into a bus, train, plane, car
                      • to leave a bus, train or plane

                    • I’m still getting over my cold.
                      • to get out of bed
                      • to manage to find a way out of a place
                      • to avoid a responsibility or duty
                      • to succeed in entering a place
                      • to have a friendly relationship with somebody
                      • to return to your usual state of health or happiness after an illness, a shock
                      • to get into a bus, train, plane, car
                      • to leave a bus, train or plane

                    • They were locked in the building and couldn’t get out.
                      • to manage to find a way out of a place
                      • to leave a bus, train or plane
                      • to return to your usual state of health or happiness after an illness, a shock
                      • to get into a bus, train, plane, car
                      • to get out of bed
                      • to succeed in entering a place
                      • to have a friendly relationship with somebody
                      • to avoid a responsibility or duty

                    • Do you get on well with your teachers?
                      • to succeed in entering a place
                      • to leave a bus, train or plane
                      • to avoid a responsibility or duty
                      • to return to your usual state of health or happiness after an illness, a shock
                      • to manage to find a way out of a place
                      • to get out of bed
                      • to have a friendly relationship with somebody
                      • to get into a bus, train, plane, car

                    • We had to break a window to get in.
                      • to manage to find a way out of a place
                      • to leave a bus, train or plane
                      • to return to your usual state of health or happiness after an illness, a shock
                      • to get into a bus, train, plane, car
                      • to get out of bed
                      • to succeed in entering a place
                      • to avoid a responsibility or duty
                      • to have a friendly relationship with somebody

                    • I said I would go shopping with him, so I can’t got out of it now.
                      • to return to your usual state of health or happiness after an illness, a shock
                      • to leave a bus, train or plane
                      • to manage to find a way out of a place
                      • to succeed in entering a place
                      • to get out of bed
                      • to get into a bus, train, plane, car
                      • to avoid a responsibility or duty
                      • to have a friendly relationship with somebody

                    • Jack got in the car and drove off.
                      • to return to your usual state of health or happiness after an illness, a shock
                      • to avoid a responsibility or duty
                      • to have a friendly relationship with somebody
                      • to get into a bus, train, plane, car
                      • to leave a bus, train or plane
                      • to manage to find a way out of a place
                      • to succeed in entering a place
                      • to get out of bed

                  • Rearrange the verbs so that each sentence has the correct verb.
                    • Don’t leave your bags on the train when you  . . . 
                      get off it
                      .
                      • get off it
                      • get on it

                    • Be quick and  . . . 
                      get in
                      with the car! We’re late.
                      • get in
                      • get on

                    • I was very angry with him, but he’ll  . . . 
                      get over it
                      .
                      • get out of it
                      • get over it

                    • You promised to help me! You can’t  . . . 
                      get out of it
                      now.
                      • get off it
                      • get out of it

                    • My parents don’t  . . . 
                      get on with
                      neighbours very well.
                      • get on with
                      • get over their

                    • Come on, lazy! It’s time to  . . . 
                      get up
                      .
                      • get up
                      • get in

                    • I watched him  . . . 
                      get on
                      his bike and ride away.
                      • get up
                      • get on

                  • PUT

                    Match each sentence with an explanation of the meaning in the box.
                    • Don’t watch me—you’re putting me off!
                      • to make trouble, problems or extra work for somebody
                      • to accept something that is annoying or unpleasant without complaining
                      • to make somebody stop liking something
                      • to place something that you are holding on the floor
                      • to disturb somebody who is trying to give their attention to something
                      • to put an item of clothing on your body
                      • to put something in a box, a drawer because you have finished using it
                      • to change something to a later date or time
                      • to stop something burning

                    • The fire was put out before the firefighters arrived.
                      • to put something in a box, a drawer because you have finished using it
                      • to change something to a later date or time
                      • to put an item of clothing on your body
                      • to make somebody stop liking something
                      • to place something that you are holding on the floor
                      • to disturb somebody who is trying to give their attention to something
                      • to stop something burning
                      • to make trouble, problems or extra work for somebody
                      • to accept something that is annoying or unpleasant without complaining

                    • He washed the dishes and put them away.
                      • to disturb somebody who is trying to give their attention to something
                      • to make trouble, problems or extra work for somebody
                      • to make somebody stop liking something
                      • to put an item of clothing on your body
                      • to put something in a box, a drawer because you have finished using it
                      • to change something to a later date or time
                      • to accept something that is annoying or unpleasant without complaining
                      • to place something that you are holding on the floor
                      • to stop something burning

                    • The accident put her off driving for years.
                      • to disturb somebody who is trying to give their attention to something
                      • to make trouble, problems or extra work for somebody
                      • to stop something burning
                      • to put something in a box, a drawer because you have finished using it
                      • to make somebody stop liking something
                      • to accept something that is annoying or unpleasant without complaining
                      • to put an item of clothing on your body
                      • to place something that you are holding on the floor
                      • to change something to a later date or time

                    • How do you put up with all that noise?
                      • to make trouble, problems or extra work for somebody
                      • to stop something burning
                      • to place something that you are holding on the floor
                      • to change something to a later date or time
                      • to put something in a box, a drawer because you have finished using it
                      • to accept something that is annoying or unpleasant without complaining
                      • to disturb somebody who is trying to give their attention to something
                      • to put an item of clothing on your body
                      • to make somebody stop liking something

                    • It’s cold outside—you’ll need to put on a coat.
                      • to place something that you are holding on the floor
                      • to make somebody stop liking something
                      • to change something to a later date or time
                      • to put an item of clothing on your body
                      • to accept something that is annoying or unpleasant without complaining
                      • to make trouble, problems or extra work for somebody
                      • to stop something burning
                      • to disturb somebody who is trying to give their attention to something
                      • to put something in a box, a drawer because you have finished using it

                    • She put her bag down by the door.
                      • to disturb somebody who is trying to give their attention to something
                      • to change something to a later date or time
                      • to stop something burning
                      • to make somebody stop liking something
                      • to put an item of clothing on your body
                      • to accept something that is annoying or unpleasant without complaining
                      • to make trouble, problems or extra work for somebody
                      • to put something in a box, a drawer because you have finished using it
                      • to place something that you are holding on the floor

                    • I’d love some tea, but I don’t want to put you out at all.
                      • to accept something that is annoying or unpleasant without complaining
                      • to make somebody stop liking something
                      • to make trouble, problems or extra work for somebody
                      • to disturb somebody who is trying to give their attention to something
                      • to stop something burning
                      • to put an item of clothing on your body
                      • to place something that you are holding on the floor
                      • to put something in a box, a drawer because you have finished using it
                      • to change something to a later date or time

                    • We’ll have to put the meeting off until next week.
                      • to put an item of clothing on your body
                      • to make somebody stop liking something
                      • to place something that you are holding on the floor
                      • to make trouble, problems or extra work for somebody
                      • to stop something burning
                      • to change something to a later date or time
                      • to disturb somebody who is trying to give their attention to something
                      • to accept something that is annoying or unpleasant without complaining
                      • to put something in a box, a drawer because you have finished using it

                  • Complete the dialogues in an appropriate way, using a phrasal verb with ‘put’ and anything else that you need.
                    • A: Would you like to stay the night here?
                      B: Oh, I don’t want to at all.

                      • A: My car broke down again the other day!
                        B: I don’t know why you it.

                        • A: Do you like strong cheese?
                          B: No, it’s the smell that

                          • A: It feels a bit cold in here.
                            B: Why don’t you (your sweater)

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