Dec 25, 2016

UNIT 133 • Verb + preposition (3) about and of

27 cards
, 73 answers
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  • Complete the sentences using ‘of’ or ‘about’.
    • Did you hear  . . . 
      about
      what happened at the party on Saturday?
      • of
      • about

    • A: I had a strange dream last night.
      B: Did you? What did you dream  . . . 
      about
      ?
      • of
      • about

    • Our neighbours complained to us  . . . 
      about
      the noise we made last night.
      • of
      • about

    • Ken was complaining  . . . 
      of
      pains in his chest, so he went to the doctor.
      • of
      • about

    • I love this music. It reminds me  . . . 
      of
      a warm day in spring.
      • of
      • about

    • He loves his job. He thinks  . . . 
      about
      his job all the time, he dreams  . . . 
      about
      it, he talks  . . . 
      about
      it and I’m fed up with hearing  . . . 
      about
      it.
      • aboutaboutofof
      • ofofaboutabout

    • I tried to remember the name of the book but I couldn’t think  . . . 
      of
      it.
      • of
      • about

    • Janet warned me  . . . 
      about
      the water. She said it wasn’t safe to drink.
      • of
      • about

    • We warned our children  . . . 
      about
      the dangers of playing in the street.
      • of
      • about

  • Complete the sentences using one of the following verbs (in the correct form) + the correct preposition:

    complain       ○      dream       ○      hear       ○      remind       ○      remind       ○      remind       ○      think       ○      think       ○      warn you
    • That’s a good idea. Why didn’t I that?
      Bill is never satisfied. He is always something.
      I can’t make a decision yet. I need time to your proposal.
      Before you go into the house, I must the dog. He is very aggressive sometimes, so be careful.
      She’s not a well-known singer. Not many people have her.
      A: You wouldn’t go away without telling me, would you?
      B: Of course not. I wouldn’t it.
      I would have forgotten my appointment if Jane hadn’t it.
      Do you see that man over there? Does he anybody you know?

    • Complete the sentences using ‘hear’ or ‘heard’ + the correct preposition (‘about’, ‘of’, ‘from’).
      • I’ve never  . . . 
        heard of
        Tom Madely. Who is he?
        • heard of
        • heard from
        • heard about

      • A: Did you  . . . 
        hear about
        the accident last night?
        B: Yes, Vicky told me.
        • hear of
        • hear from
        • hear about

      • Jill used to write to me quite often but I haven’t  . . . 
        heard from
        her for ages now.
        • heard of
        • heard from
        • heard about

      • A: Have you  . . . 
        heard of
        a writer called William Hudson?
        B: No, I don’t think so. What sort of writer is he?
        • heard of
        • heard from
        • heard about

      • Thank you for your letter. It was good to  . . . 
        hear from
        you again.
        • hear of
        • hear from
        • hear about

      • A: Do you want to  . . . 
        hear about
        our holiday?
        B: Not now. Tell me later.
        • hear of
        • hear from
        • hear about

      • I live in a very small town in the north of England. You’ve probably never  . . . 
        heard of
        it.
        • heard of
        • heard from
        • heard about

    • Complete the sentences using ‘think about’ or ‘think of’. Use the correct form of ‘think’.
      • You look serious. What are you  . . . 
        thinking about
        ?
        • thinking of
        • thinking about

      • I like to have time to make decisions. I like to  . . . 
        think about
        things carefully.
        • think of
        • think about

      • He’s a very selfish person. He only  . . . 
        thinks about
        himself.
        • thinks of
        • thinks about

      • I don’t know what to get Ann for her birthday. Can you  . . . 
        think of
        anything?
        • think of
        • think about

      • A: I’ve finished reading the book you lent me.
        B: Have you? What did you  . . . 
        think of
        it? Did you like it?
        • think of
        • think about

      • We’re  . . . 
        thinking about
        going out for a meal this evening. Would you like to come?
        • thinking of
        • thinking about

      • I don’t really want to go out with Ian tonight. I’ll have to  . . . 
        think of
        an excuse.
        • think of
        • think about

      • Carol is rather homesick. She’s always thinking about her family back home.
        • thinking of
        • thinking about

      • When I was offered the job, I didn’t accept immediately. I went away and  . . . 
        thought about
        it for a while. In the end I decided to take the job.
        • thought of
        • thought about

      • I don’t  . . . 
        think much of
        this coffee. It’s like water.
        • think much of
        • think much about

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